This page gives some information on radio control frequencies for use with model boats.

N.B. Please always check who is using which frequencies BEFORE turning on or ‘testing’ your R/C Transmitter! This is especially important at Beale Park when the Inner & Outer Lakes may be in use at the same time.


27Mhz
The 27MHz band is for general surface based models (boats, cars) and is also shared with CB Radio users. As the radio gear is relatively cheap, this band is commonly used for many remote control toys, and as such, ‘serious’ users can suffer from interferance near populated areas. However, the Beale Park is well away from such areas, and interference is not a problem, unless a visitor to the Park is operating a buggy or similar (a quet word with a parent usually does the trick!). 27MHz sets are usually fairly basic 2-channel (for boats, rudder and power or sail control), though servo-reverse, battery indicator and throttle bias are more-or-less standard these days.

On 27MHz, the frequency is denoted by a channel number (1-32) or, for models, more commonly a colour (either a ‘solid’ like Red, or a ‘split’ like Yellow/Green). The frequency in use should be indicated by a suitably coloured ribbon attached to the top of the transmitter aerial. The table below shows the frequencies in the 27MHz band and the colours for model use in the UK (non-colour frequencies are allotted to e.g. CB radio).


35Mhz
The 35MHz band is for the exclusive use of airbourne models (fixed wing & helicopter, etc). So unless you have a flying boat, this band is illegal for use with model boats.


40Mhz
The 40MHz band is also for general surface based models (boats, cars), and is rarely affected by interference (unless two people nearby are operating on the same frequency!). Until recently, only FM (frequency-modulation) transmission mode was available in the UK. Such sets can range from simple 2-channel up to 8-channel, with a wide range of features such as channel mixing, model (settings) memories, computer set-up etc. Naturally these features come at a nice price. Over the past few months, AM (amplitude-modulation) sets have come onto the UK market. These are, so far, fairly basic 2-channel sets, similar in features (and price) to 27MHz sets.

On 40MHz, the frequency is denoted by a 3-digit number (665-995), being the ‘decimal’ part of the frequency following the ’40’. The frequency in use should be indicated by the three digits in white on a green flag attached to the top of the transmitter aerial. Frequencies can be divided into ‘odd’ and ‘even’ numbers – the middle digit of the three determining the odd/even status (e.g. 665 is an ‘even’ frequency and 995 is ‘odd’). The table below shows the frequencies in the 40MHz model band and the flag numbers for use in the UK.


41Mhz
The 41MHz band is also for general surface based models (boats, cars), in Europe but this band is illegal for use in the UK.